The Sense of Touch

person holding babys hand

Touch is the fourth sense among the twelve that Rudolf Steiner, founder of Waldorf Education, developed and introduced about 100 years ago. The sense of touch is a lower sense, classified as physical, inner, or a sense of the will.  We are affected inwardly by touching outwardly.  This begins with birth and continues through our whole lives. We can help our children develop this sense with awareness of what they touch.  Providing a variety of experiences including temperature, texture, and location will strengthen this sense.  A strong sense of touch as a child will give way to… Read More

Support Brings Release

That phrase is one I heard many times from a friend and yoga instructor. In the body it relates to the muscles, ligaments, bones and even the mind. I have come to think of it as a holistic approach to the way I work.  While doing certain poses and with the support of props; such as rolled blankets, pillows and blocks, we can settle into our bodies in ways that are supporting for the body to release and relax bringing a deeper awareness of inner peace. I have felt this in my life when… Read More

In Search of Meaning

As humans, we feel a need to make meaning from our experiences. Because of this, I imagine ritual has been a part of human existence since the beginning of time. I am drawn to using ritual as a spiritual practice and creating a container for life’s moments, whether they be challenges, celebrations, or simply to mark a meaningful experience. As I began working with congregations in transition, I brought this practice into my work as an interim director of faith formation.  If this past year taught me anything, it is that life is… Read More

The Sense of Balance

Balance is the third sense among the twelve that Rudolf Steiner, founder of Waldorf Education, developed and introduced about 100 years ago. On his website, van Gelder indicated Balance was the fourth sense, but Steiner identified it as the third sense in his book, Spiritual Science as a Foundation for Social Forms. The sense of balance is the third of the lower senses, classified as physical, inner, or a sense of the will.  These senses are helpful with perception of one’s own body. This is your proprioceptive system at work! The sense of balance begins… Read More

Actions Have Consequences

street signs

February 12, 2021By Deborah Weiner, GIRE Transitions Consultant “Actions have consequences,” my spouse would say to our children as they were growing up.  They were – as is the case with so may children and youth – focused on experimenting, gaining independence, and being ‘their own people.’ Sometimes the experiments worked.  Sometimes – not so much.  The stealing of a street sign one night was an example of an impulse that didn’t work out well…our daughter had to hear from us about why that was not a good idea, and was mortified… Read More

The Sense of Movement

sense of movement

Movement is the second sense among the twelve that Rudolf Steiner, founder of Waldorf Education, developed and introduced about 100 years ago. The sense of movement is a lower sense, classified as physical, inner, or a sense of the will.  These inward senses make the effects of the external world upon us evident and are helpful with perception of one’s own body. This is your proprioceptive system at work! The sense of movement allows you to know where parts of your body are and what position they are in space.  This may be extremely subtle… Read More

Collaborative Leadership

photo of people near wooden table

      Collaborative leadership came into public view in the early 1990s (Chrislip and Larson, 1994).  The fundamental premise of collaborative leadership is that any organization is only as strong as each individual’s collective strength within the organization. The strength of the contributors becomes evident through creative problem solving for shared concerns of the organizations.       The collaborative leader encourages relationships that are grounded in commitment and prioritizes confidence in collaborators in the group. The resulting trusting relationship is mutually beneficial because as peer problem solvers, contributors encourage each other to achieve group… Read More

The Sense of Life

woman surrounded by sunflowers

Amy Huntereece, PhD candidate, M.Ed. January 2021 Life is the first sense among the 12 that Rudolf Steiner, founder of Waldorf Education, developed and introduced about 100 years ago. The sense of life is a lower sense, classified as physical, inner, or a sense of the will.  These inward senses make the effects of the external world upon us evident. They are helpful with perception of one’s own body. The sense of life informs you of being full, indigestion, needing to use the toilet, an injury, or a body ache.  Usually this… Read More

Rudolf Steiner’s Theory of the Twelve Senses

selective focus photography of red waterlily flower in bloom

by Amy Huntereece, PhD candidate, M.Ed., January 2021 Note: Steiner’s schema is an ancient wisdom that models a spirit imbued view of science. Though other cultures exemplified a similar, common philosophy of thinking, Steiner was inspired by Goethian thinking. His 12 senses theory offered an educational perspective that provided a way to nourish developing human beings with a more nuanced experience in the world. If the human being proceeded through the development and any senses went underdeveloped, they could be noticed as missing even if people could not explain it. Their absence… Read More

Polarity Awareness During Transition

By Amy Huntereece, PhD candidate, M. Ed., January 2021 Is your congregation in the midst of transition? Perhaps you are even experiencing transition on multiple levels.  Remodeling or building new facilities, ministerial leadership shifting to new energy, updating your religious education program, and careful scrutiny of the operating budget to make ends meet in the upcoming fiscal year all qualify as transitional work.  La Sonde Anastos (2017) encourages us to remember that we are “in a time of change, not a time of crisis” (p. 98). You may notice your response to… Read More